Travel Guide to Alice Springs, Northern Territory, Australia

[Music plays] Welcome to Alice Springs, the gateway to Australia's Red Centre, and a place where the spirit of adventure is well and truly alive.

To help you get the most out of your visit, we're going to show you some of the experiences on offer for any budget.

Early pioneers to Central Australia really epitomised adventure.

So to re-live an exotic part of Alice Springs' history, jump on board a camel and cross the desert with Pyndan camel tracks.

This family run business offers a memourable and relaxing experience with one hour or half day camel rides.

And for the more adventurous, overnight camel treks are also on offer.

For an adventure of a different kind, come face to face with desert animals at the Alice Springs Reptile Centre.

View thorny devils, frill neck lizards, huge parent iguanas, large pythons, venomous snakes, and the largest collection of Northern Territory gekkos in the world.

For an unforgettable once in a lifetime experience, rise at dawn for a sunrise balloon flight with Outback Ballooning.

They offer daily flights depending on weather conditions and provide a spectacular perspective of the Red Centre's desert landscape.

A colourful journey of surprise still awaits you in Alice Springs.

It is the birthplace of the contemporary Aboriginal art movement and considered to be the Aboriginal art capital of Australia.

The vibrant canvasses, sculptures and weavings bring the region alive and tell the unique and compelling stories of the land and its people.

But it's not just world-class art that Alice has it's also the home to many places of spiritual and cultural significance.

Drop into the new Indigenous Tourism Club, central Aboriginal experiences, for the best selection of Indigenous tours on offer.

They represent over 13 cultural tours including art workshop, visiting rock art sites, a cultural bike riding tour, and dining out under a million stars with a gourmeted bush tucker feast.

A great way to spend a leisurely afternoon is to explore some of the local town's attractions.

Once place not to be missed is the Araluen Centre, home to an important collection of early Australian works from Albert Namatjira.

The centre is also home to one of Alice Springs' most quirky events, the Beanie Festival, held at the end of June.

More than 3,000 beanies are on displayhere over the course of the festival.

So this is a great place to come and find the perfect iconic Australian hat.

Alice Springs offers an excellent choice of accommodation.

So if an oasis in the Outback is what you're after, the Desert Palms Resort is a tropical paradise.

A short walk from the town centre the resort has comfortable, air-conditioned self-contained villas and wi-fi internet access in all villas.

The friendly reception can also book a large range of tours to suit your itinerary in Alice and the Red Centre.

Alice Springs is serviced with flights from most capital cities daily.

For self-drivers, the Explorer's way or Stuart highway connects Alice Springs with Adelaide and Darwin.

Rail travel in The Ghan is another popular option.

And a regular coach services into Alice Springs are also available with Greyhound Australia which has daily departures to Darwin and Adelaide.

Whatever you choose, Alice Springs has plenty on offer.

The only difficulty will be deciding on what to do or see next.

Source: Youtube